Senior Care Options in Canada

Seniors (people aged 65 or older) represent 16% of the Canadian population and are expected to grow by more than 68% over the next two decades. Seniors aged 85 and over have already become the fastest-growing segment of the Canadian population.

With an aging population, the complexity of the care needed for older Canadians is also increasing. It can be a daunting task for seniors and their families to choose the types of care best suited for their needs. The available choices are myriad. Each option had its own pros and cons. The cost, location and level of service can vary profoundly.

We have compiled this guide as a quick and easy reference for seniors and families to get started on their care selection journey.

Should you need help or advice, you can reach out to ConsidraCare's care experts at 1-855-410-7971 and we will be glad to be of service.

Five factors to consider before choosing a senior care option

1

Location: Is the care going to be provided at home or would my loved one need to move to a new residence?

2

Convenience: Is the location (if it is a care facility) convenient for my loved one and the family? Would it keep my loved one connected with the community and neighbourhood?

3

Cost: Are the costs transparent? How much would additional services cost? How much will the costs increase if the care needs of my loved one increase?

4

Quality of Care: Is the care tailored for my loved one's needs? Would the care be delivered by the same caregiver(s) most of the time? What if my loved one doesn't like a caregiver? Would I be kept aware of my loved one's status and care delivery on a regular basis?

5

Independence: Does the type of care restrict my loved one's social life and daily routine? Would it limit family visits, the ability to keep pets, what to eat and when and where to go outside?

Adult Daycare

1: Adult Daycare

Adult daycare consists of a planned program of activities in a professional care setting designed for seniors/older adults who require care and support during the day. These centres enable seniors to socialize and interact with other individuals whilst still receiving necessary health support. This service offers family caregivers accountable respite from caregiving.

Who is it for?

Adult daycare centres are for people whose care needs can be managed at home, and only require little-medium levels of support in terms of health. Support is periodic and is usually provided from 4-16 hours a day.

How much does it cost?

Average cost per day: $24+
Cost is dependant on the adult day centre:

Questions to ask when choosing the facility:
Advantages
Disadvantages
Indepedent Living Facilities

2. Retirement Homes: Indepedant Living Facilities

Retirement homes (independent living) are privately owned facilities designed to accommodate individuals in their senior years. 24-hour nursing care is not provided, as these types of facilities look to serve those wishing to maintain their lifestyle whilst also receiving minimal on-site support and care. Unlike Long-term care homes, they are not meant to serve individuals in need of prolonged medical attention.

Who is it for?

Care needs range from low to medium, with most seniors needing little to no assistance. Medical and physical support is available throughout the day upon request but is not part of an everyday routine.

How much does it cost?

Average cost per month: $3,000 - $6,000
Retirement homes can be funded publicly and or privately:

Questions to ask when choosing the facility:
Advantages
Disadvantages
Assisted Living Facilities

3. Retirement Homes: Assisted Living Facilities

Retirement homes (independent living) are privately owned facilities designed to accommodate individuals in their senior years. 24-hour nursing care is not provided, as these types of facilities look to serve those wishing to maintain their lifestyle whilst also receiving minimal on-site support and care. Unlike LTC homes, they are not meant to serve individuals in need of prolonged medical attention.

Who is it for?

Care needs range from low to medium, with most seniors needing little to no assistance. Medical and physical support is available throughout the day upon request but is not part of an everyday routine.

How much does it cost?

Average cost per month: $3,000 - $6,000
Retirement homes can be funded publicly and or privately:

Questions to ask when choosing the facility:
Advantages
Disadvantages
Long Term Care Homes

4. Long Term Care Homes

Long-term care (LTC) homes, also known as Homes for the Aged or Nursing Homes, are homes publicly funded by the government to provide care for people facing significant health challenges. LTC homes provide 24-hour access to nursing care and supervision alongside a variety of therapies and other daily living activities.

Who is it for?

Care needs of Long-term Care residents are extremely high - they typically require around-the-clock assistance for daily activities as well as medical and or physical conditions.

How much does it cost?

Average cost per month: $1,800 - $2,800 (government-subsidized)
Care provided is free-of-charge, clients are responsible for paying accommodation costs:

Questions to ask when choosing the facility:
Advantages
Disadvantages
Hospices

5. Hospices

Hospice care facilities provide a specialized form of healthcare for individuals and families who are living with a life-limiting illness that is at an advanced stage. The aim of these facilities is to provide comfort and dignity as well as the best quality of life for loved ones and their families. These facilities are specifically intended for individuals approaching the end of their life.

Who is it for?

Care needs of hospice residents are extremely high and cannot be met at home. Typically, around-the-clock care is required as well as constant monitoring and supervision.

How much does it cost?

Average cost per month: $0 - $450
There is usually no charge for hospice residents:

Questions to ask when choosing the facility:
Advantages
Disadvantages
In-Home Care

6. In-Home Care

In-home care is health and or supportive care provided by a caregiver in the home of a loved one. Typically, caregivers are personal support workers (PSWs) or nurses employed and managed by government or private agencies. They provide help with activities such as dressing, bathing, basic medicine administration, companionship, transportation and more.

Who is it for?

Care needs are mid-level and can be managed with the help of a professional caregiver at home. Care hours can range from 4-24+ hours depending on the client and their personal needs.

How much does it cost?

Average cost per hour: $25 - $38 (varies based on nature of care)
Home care can be publicly or privately funded:

Questions to ask when choosing the facility:
Advantages
Disadvantages
Live-in Care

7. Live-in Care

Live-in caregivers provide assistance with activities of daily living, including meal preparation, medication reminders, transportation, companionship and much more. The caregivers reside in their clients' homes. They are available to support their client's throughout the day around a pre-agreed schedule. The caregivers are employees of the clients or their families, not agencies.

Who is it for?

Care needs range from mild to moderate levels. Live-in care is best suited for seniors who like the comfort and independence of their home and is provided anywhere between 8-20 hours a day.

How much does it cost?

Average cost per month: $3,500 - $5,000 (approximately $17 - $27 per hour)
Live-in caregivers are usually contracted independently but may be sourced through an agency

Questions to ask when interviewing a potential live-in caregiver:
Advantages
Disadvantages

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